Schedule

August 25: Introductions

what is multimodal composition and why should you care?; overview of class syllabus and projects; what YOU value in students & teachers; setting up your blog

in-class

  • introduction to multimodal composition & scholarly multimedia
  • student reflection examples: Andrew‘s, Christina’s
  • introduce class blog/syllabus
  • class-member introductions: what are YOUR values for this class
  • BREAK
  • why are we using blogs as class portfolios? (examples, blog application affordances, domains)
  • setting up your blog on WordPress
  • homework review

homework:

  1. Choose a blog template, making sure it has all the features you need (from class discussion).
  2. Create an About page and/or bio on your blog.
  3. Add a link in your blog to this course blog (e.g., http://www.ceball.com/classes/239/fall10)
  4. Email me (cball at ilstu dot edu) your blog URL by 8am next Wednesday.
  5. Write a blog post describing why you choose the blog template and widgets you did.
  6. By next Wednesday, Sept. 8 at 8am, complete the syllabus-response blog post (see Home page/blog for details).
  7. By Wed., Sept. 8, read Chapter 1 of Making Multimodal Projects (Posted. Note that the chapter is still in progress. Some of the parts that aren’t filled in, we’ll discuss in class.)
  8. By Wed., Sept. 8 at 10am, read/do ix: visual exercises CD (in reserves at Milner) — you do NOT need to write up the assignments, although you should read & think through them.
  9. optional readings:

September 1: NO CLASS

September 8: The Language of Scholarly Multimedia

putting language to new genres/texts/modes/media; getting our hands dirty with technology

in class:

  • discussion of reading(s): (1) [small group chat] Chapter 1 — what do you need/want to know? how do modes work?
  • BREAK
  • hands-on work: (0) email etiquette, (1) blog fixes, (2) RSS feeds, (3) Technology Literacy Narratives

homework (updated on Sept. 14, per what I said in class):

  • Subscribe to the class blog’s RSS feed. (rss-feed-setup tutorial video. You may also choose to subscribe to your classmates’ blog feeds, but that is optional.)
  • Write a blog post on how you would revise/redo your literacy narrative (see Assignments>Literacy Narrative for more info. As mentioned in class, you don’t actually have to finish/upload your narrative, as I took the media. We’ll discuss the revision ideas in class next Wednesday.)
  • Find and summarize 3 pieces of digital media (see class blog post) due 8am Wed. (See the reading heuristic here.)

September 15: Reading  & Analyzing Scholarly Multimedia

What do you value in digital media? how do you read it? what do you take away from it? How do those values translate (or not) to scholarly multimedia? What does digital writing studies value about scholarly multimedia?

in class:

  • small groups: review examples of “wowful” digital media texts y’all came up with on your blogs.
  • discuss how the reading heuristic worked, or didn’t work, to help you describe those texts
  • Q: How does what you value in wowed digital texts relate to your own revision ideas for your literacy narrative?
  • BREAK
  • short re-intro to digital scholarship & scholarly multimedia (as genre/s within field/s)
  • Watch “This is Scholarship” (from Kairos 12.3)
  • Rhetorical Analysis: What does this piece tell us about what the field of digital writing values about scholarly multimedia? (link from Silva Rhetorica)
  • Q: What does rhetorical analysis leave out, if anything? (How do you marry your values/expectations with this particular text?)

homework:

  • Read Kairos Manifesto issue peer-review criteria (online; 1pg)
  • Read Allison Warner’s  heuristic assessment tool for evaluating digital scholarship (optional: read full “article” here)
  • Read IML’s honors thesis parameters
  • After reading the above heuristics, write up the Values & Criteria Analysis (see the Assignments). This is due by noon, Wednesday, Sept. 22.
  • Draw up your proposal and storyboard for revising your Literacy Narrative. (See revised Assignment description under the Assignments tab of the class blog.) Bring a paper copy of your proposal and storyboard to class on Wednesday, Sept. 22.

September 22: Creating Criteria & Genre/Venue Analyses

What does the field value and how does that map onto our values of digital media and scholarly multimedia?; taking a close look at the publication venues for our major projects

in-class

  • collect proposals and storyboards
  • discuss values & criteria analysis, peer-review process, and create a short list
  • group work: apply short list to
  1. Kuhn’s “The Components of Scholarly Multimedia
  2. Watkins’ “Words are the Ultimate Abstraction
  3. Miles et al.’s (2003) Violence of Text

optional follow-up readings to the above two texts:

  1. Converging the ASS[umptions] between U and ME” (about the Watkins’ piece)
  2. Show, Not Tell: The Value of New Media Scholarship” (about the Miles’ piece)
  • refine short list of criteria
  • BREAK
  • discuss online journals & genre analysis (homework)
  • completing your Literacy Narratives (equipment, schedules, citations, permissions, etc.)

homework:

  • Read the other example that you didn’t look at in your group in class (either Watkins’ or Miles’ text). Then, using the four short lists (one from each group) of evaluative criteria that y’all posted to the class blog at the end of class, decide WHICH ONE (or some combination thereof) makes the most sense to use with the text you just read (Watkins or Miles, whichever you just read for this assignment). Post your response on your blog.
  • Read Kairos’s “About” and “Submissions” page (online)
  • Read C&C Online’s “Submissions” page (online)
  • Read TheJUMP’s “About” and “CFP/CFMP” (ignore the spam comments) and “Submissions” pages (online)
  • While you’re on the above journal’s pages, skim some of the example texts to get a feel for whether the journal’s submission requirements live up to the texts they publish. (e.g., is what they’re asking for what they get/publish? Where can you see yourself within any of these journals? What genres, what content, are you most interested in? — you’re starting to get ideas for proposing your own project!)
  • Write one blog post that summarizes your understanding of the submission values (including genre conventions and readership/audience) of each scholarly multimedia journal. Discuss how those values as listed in the submissions pages relate to the values/criteria we created in class. (You will perform a rhetorical genre analysis on the venues, but the blog post doesn’t have to be essayistic or incredibly lengthy. It can be 3-4 paragraphs or several lengthy bullet points. You might link to relevant pages in the the journals, or incorporate screen shots in your post.)
  • complete your Literacy Narrative and bring e-copy to class to “turn in”
  • optional readings:
    1. Douglas Eyman’s “The Arrow and the Loom
    2. Jim Kalmbach’s “Reading the Archives: Ten years on nonlinear (Kairos) history

September 29: Crafting Your Idea

what technologies do you need to make scholarly multimedia? how does that choice depend on what your project idea is?

in class:

  • collect literacy narratives (email w/URL, CD, etc.)
  • go over Tech Review assignment & sandbox/server info
  • attend creativity/invention panel at 1:30pm in STV 350a
  • brainstorming ideas
  • vote on criteria (read your classmates’ blog posts where they outline which criteria they think we should adopt for class)

homework:

  • optional: Read Jennifer Sheppard’s “The Rhetorical Work of Multimedia Production Practices: It’s More than Just Technical Skill” sdarticle(3)

October 6: Technologies & Accessibility

what are the affordances of technologies at your disposal? how do they work? what could they accomplish for you in your scholarly multimedia projects? how do you choose technologies and compose towards better accessibility?

in class:

  • fixing 239sandbox issues
  • Tech Review presentations
  • technology and accessibility issues
  • BREAK
  • brainstorming project ideas
  • discussion of the pitch assignment [example pitches]

homework:

  • complete your pitch presentation by noon next Wednesday (see Pitch assignment tab)


October 13: Choosing Your Projects

so… what’s your idea?? and how do you get r done?

in-class

  • pitches
  • voting on project topics
  • BREAK
  • choosing groups
  • discuss proposals (what ARE proposals? what rhetorical work do they do?) and team contracts
  • meet with groups to strategize workflow

homework:

advanced/optional readings:

October 20: Collecting Assets & Using/Citing Them Fairly

in class:

  • overview of proposals (needs, troubleshooting, etc.)
  • discussion of how copyright issues affect your composing process
  • using Zotero for collecting and organizing assets/citations
  • group work (tech needs?)

homework:

  • storyboard/script/draft your project concept & post to your blog by Sunday, 8am. Each person in the group should post the “map” as well as outline your individual roles/tasks and deadlines for the project.
  • gather project assets — have in digital format by the time class starts next week
  • read Delagrange’s “When Revision is Redesign: Key Questions for Digital Scholarship” and post a reflection on your blog stating how her revision process might affect some of the compositional issues you should pay attention to as you design

October 27: Large-Scale Editing

organizing, logging digital assets, editing, & creating rough cuts

in-class:

  • how to organize your assets
  • importing and logging digital assets into software
  • creating a rough cut (organized version of roughly edited clips according to workplan/storyboard/script) of your project in your chosen software program
  • create a mock-up of the website that will house your other digital assets (video, etc.)

homework:

  • gather project assets — have in digital format by the time class starts next week
  • start rough cut of project; due by start of class next week

November 3: Small-Scale Editing

clarifying purpose of project through rough-cut review; trimming, editing, timing, revising, testing…

in-class:

  • work on the above issues in your projects

homework:

  • continue working on project (should be getting near to having a peer-review draft ready)
  • write a progress-report blog post on your part of the project (due by 9am next Wed!)

November 10: Fine-tuning

putting everything together

in-class

  • put finishing touches on text
  • testing Web delivery

homework:

  • finish any last-minute changes
  • have a working version of your webtext ready by the beginning of class next week

November 17: Usability Testing & Peer-Review

in class:

  • workshop classmates’ projects using peer-review criteria
  • compose individual peer-review letters and email to entire group, copying me, by Friday night
  • talk about how to choose how to revise based on letters
  • discuss submission letter assignment

homework:

  • finish/send peer-review letters by Friday night
  • write a blog post on how you plan to revise your group project based on the feedback by Monday after Thanksgiving break (each person writes an individual post; then compare notes before class Wednesday, Dec. 1)

++++++++++++++

THANKSGIVING

++++++++++++++

December 1: Revising

in class:

  • discuss planned revision strategies
  • work on revisions
  • overview of portfolio reflection assignment

homework:

December 8: Portfolio and class wrap-up

  • watch any reflections and/or projects that are done
  • evaluations
  • work on project revisions in class, if needed

homework: